Ireland has no plans to import beef from US in 2017

RTE 1/10 Ireland has a ‘good deal’ to offer American consumers with a ban on beef imports from the US, the country’s agriculture minister has said.

Speaking ahead of a visit to the US to meet with US President Donald Trump, Michael Creedon said he hoped to be able to “talk to the president about that” during the visit.

He said there were a number of countries where beef was being imported into Ireland and there were “good deals” there for the US consumers, adding that the country was “looking to take advantage of the situation”.

“We want to help the US as much as possible, but we are not going to take anything from them.

That’s not going into our decision-making,” Mr Creedon told the Irish Independent.

Mr Creedons comments came after a meeting between US President Trump and Irish President Michael D Higgins in Washington DC on Thursday.

The US president will also meet with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and Irish Trade Minister Simon Coveney at the White House on Thursday evening.

Mr Trump is expected to discuss the “fiscal cliff”, trade, trade and the US economy at the US president’s arrival in the capital.

“We have a good deal to offer to the American consumers.

We are a very good friend of the US,” Mr Coveny told the Independent.

Mr Creedony said the Government was “not looking to take away the United Nations mandate on the export of beef” and would be “open to discussions” with the US on that. “

I don’t think we’re going to be importing from other countries either.”

Mr Creedony said the Government was “not looking to take away the United Nations mandate on the export of beef” and would be “open to discussions” with the US on that.

However, the Government said it would not be able “to impose tariffs or quotas” on beef.

“There will be no blanket ban on the importation of beef,” Mr Connor said.

“That’s just a fact.

There are good trade deals and we’re open to discussions.

We’ve got a good, friendly relationship with the United states, which is why we’ve got an agreement in place with them.”

He said Ireland was “working very hard” to secure a beef export agreement with the EU.

“If we can reach a deal that is acceptable to both sides we’ll certainly look at it.”

He also told the Press Association that Ireland was a member of the International Beef Alliance, which represents beef producers in the US.

“Our position is that if a country wants to have a beef product that they’re going, they have to sell it to us.

We’re going forward with that, but our position is to ensure that the international agreement that exists is fair and that the beef that is produced in Ireland is fair,” he said.