Why the Conservative Case for a Bionic Chicken

This week, the Republican Party’s new nominee for the vice presidency, Mike Pence, has proposed that the U.S. government should develop a bionic chicken that will deliver high-tech and advanced medical treatment to Americans.

The proposed bionic “chicken” would be able to deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to the body.

According to Pence, the technology is available now and could be developed much faster if the government was willing to fund it.

“We can do this at a fraction of the cost,” he told reporters.

“That’s the kind of technology that can help people.”

The idea that bionic chickens could be delivered directly to patients is not new.

In the 1980s, a team of Japanese researchers began testing the technology on human fetuses.

The chicken that was released from their lab had a brain that could read brain waves and could transmit them to other chickens.

The idea was that, when implanted in a patient, the chicken would be capable of responding to the person’s brain signals and delivering the medication, thereby improving their quality of life.

The project was funded by the government, which was concerned that the human fetal version would be a burden on the country’s budget and potentially cause an increase in the number of people with disabilities.

But in the end, it was only the first step in a process that would eventually lead to the creation of a bionics-powered robotic system that could deliver medication directly to a patient. “

This was a concern at the beginning.”

But in the end, it was only the first step in a process that would eventually lead to the creation of a bionics-powered robotic system that could deliver medication directly to a patient.

The bionic-chicken concept has since been developed by companies that are developing a bionetic robot that can deliver medicine directly to people in the United States.

It has been called “the most advanced bionic system on the market” and has been licensed to BioServ Corp., which is based in Texas.

BioServ is the company behind a prototype bionic cart that can be used to deliver medication to patients in the U, U.K. and Germany.

Bioserv CEO Michael Schumacher said the company’s bionic robot could deliver drugs to people within three days of being implanted in patients.

“The chicken is an advanced system that is a step ahead of any other system that we have,” Schumachers told Business Insider.

“And we think it is safe and effective for patients.”

The bionics bionic Chicken.

(Photo: BioServ) BioServ’s prototype cart was the first bionic delivery system to be developed for the U